Afghanistan
Wir verwenden Cookies und Analysetools, um die Nutzerfreundlichkeit der Internetseite zu verbessern und passende Werbung von watson und unseren Werbepartnern anzuzeigen. Weitere Infos findest Du in unserer Datenschutzerklärung.

Fotos einer untergegangenen Welt

Kabul 1967: So schön war Afghanistan, bevor es vom Krieg zerrissen wurde

Seit fast vierzig Jahren führen die Afghanen Krieg. Gegen die Russen, gegeneinander, gegen die Taliban, gegen die Amerikaner. Ob die Gewalt mit dem Abzug der Nato dieses Jahr zu einem Ende kommt, darf bezweifelt werden. Heute nur schwer vorstellbar: Bevor das Unheil 1978 mit einem kommunistischen Putsch seinen Lauf nahm, war Afghanistan ein wunderschönes Land.

Der Amerikaner William Podlich (1915-2008) durfte dies mit eigenen Augen sehen, als er Ende der 1960er Jahre als Bildungsberater der UNESCO in Afghanistan arbeitete. Der Hobbyfotograf dokumentierte seinen Aufenthalt ausgiebig und schuf so ein einzigartiges Zeitdokument. Sein Schwiegersohn Clayton Esterson hat die über 200 Farbdias eingescannt und auf einer Website zugänglich gemacht.

Mit seiner freundlichen Erlaubnis zeigt watson hier eine Auswahl von 19 Bildpaaren, jeweils mit einer Aufnahme Podlichs und einem Gegenstück aus der oft tristen Gegenwart.

1. Frauen nachschauen

Bild: Esterson/Podlich

Two Burqa-clad Afghan women walk past a heavily-guarded U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Thursday, Jan. 17, 2002. Secretary of State Powell visited Kabul Thursday to become the highest-ranking U.S. government official to visit Afghanistan since 1976. (AP Photo/Enric Marti)

Bild: AP

2. Königspalast

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

Afghan boys make a snowman by the palace of the late King Amanullah Khan, which was destroyed during the civil war in the early 1990s, in Kabul, Afghanistan, Friday, Feb. 7, 2014. Kabul has been experiencing below freezing weather and snow. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Bild: AP

3. Kabul-Fluss

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

Afghans burn waste items in a polluted river in Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, Dec. 29, 2011. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)

Bild: AP



4. Busfahrt

Bild: Esterson/Podlich

U.S. soldiers with Task Force Red Horse wait in a bus to be transported for the airport section to leave Afghanistan, at the U.S. base in Bagram, north of Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, July 14, 2011. U.S. President Barack Obama announced last month that he would pull 10,000 of the extra troops out in 2011 and the remaining 23,000 by the summer of 2012. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)

Bild: AP

5. Primarschule

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

An Afghan girl looks through a window of her class room at the girls high school Ayeshe Sedeqa in the center of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, Sunday, Sept. 21, 2008. About 3000 girls of Kunduz attend in three different shift daily school lessons.(AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)

Bild: AP

6. Oberstufe

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

Shakila, left, 32, (not seen completely in picture), holds a text book while she gives lessons to Afghan girls at a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Wednesday, Sept.17, 2003. In the post-Taliban era , Afghanistan has seen an increase in school attendance. According to UNICEF, this year there are 4.2 million Afghan children in 7,000 schools in the country, and a 37 percent increase in the number of girls in school since last year. (KEYSTONE/AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Bild: AP

7. Stossverkehr

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

** APN ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, DEC. 25 ** Hundreds of cars are at a standstill in one of Kabul's busy streets, Sept. 24, 2003. The number of cars in Kabul skyrocketed after the ouster of the Taliban in 2001 and traffic jams are frequent. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Bild: AP

8. (Ein-)Schlagloch

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

epa03203368 Afghan security officials measure the crater formed at the scene of a suicide bomb attack, in Kabul, Afghanistan, 02 May 2012. A suicide bomber detonated his explosives-filled vehicle outside the Kabul guest house, hours after the US President Barack Obama left the country, killing at least six people. Obama was in Kabul late 01 May where he signed a 10-year strategic partnership agreement between the US and Afghanistan. The Taliban condemned the pact.  EPA/S. SABAWOON

Bild: EPA

9. Park

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

Afghans lay on the grass, as they talk at a park in Kabul, Afghanistan, Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2009. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)

Bild: AP

10. Aussicht

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

An Afghan policeman sits on a wall on a mountain overlooking Kabul, Afghanistan, Wednesday, May, 22, 2013. (AP Photo/Ahmad Jamshid)

Bild: AP

11. Shopping

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

In this Oct. 23, 2012 photo, Afghan women shop in a crowded bazaar in the heart of Lashkar Gah, southern Helmand’s provincial capital in Afghanistan. After 11 years of war residents of southern Helmand, one of the deadliest battlefields, are frustrated by the lack of development and widespread insecurity. The International  community is also increasingly worried that the gains made by women after the collapse of the Taliban are slowly slipping away. In deeply conservative Helmand women have worn the all encompassing burqas for centuries yet they too say the increasing insecurity makes them afraid even from behind their veils and shopkeepers say burqa sales are up.  (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)

Bild: AP

12. Flughafen

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

Italian soldiers of International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) carry coffin of the Italian soldier  who were killed by a roadside bomb in south of Kabul,  to a plane for transferring them to Italy,  during a ceremony for transferring the coffins to Italy at the Kabul International airport, Afghanistan on Sunday, May  7, 2006.    International security forces in Afghanistan suffered their first losses in six months when a roadside bomb killed two Italian soldiers and wounded four as they were going to help Afghan police injured in an earlier attack.     (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)

Bild: AP

13. Kinder

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

An Italian soldier with the International Security Assistance Force, ISAF,  plays with Afghan children, during a visit to their school, in Herat, Afghanistan, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2009. Italian soldiers promised to build a new building for the school. (AP Photo/Fraidoon Pooyaa)

Bild: AP

14. Fastfood

Bild: Esterson/Podlich

US soldiers have lunch at the shopping area of the Kandahar military base, south Afghanistan, Wednesday, Aug 2, 2006. Afghanistan is wracked by its deadliest spate of violence since U.S.-led forces toppled the Taliban regime in late 2001 for hosting Osama bin Laden. More than 900 people _ mainly militants _ have been killed since May. (KEYSTONE/AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

Bild: AP

15. Blumenzucht

Bild: Esterson/Podlich

** ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 3 **In this photo taken July 16, 2009, Police officers from the district of Ar Gul, swing away with long sticks to eradicate a patch of illegally grown poppies in the Badakhshan province of Afghanistan. Two years ago, opium _ the raw ingredient used to make heroine _ was grown on nearly half a million acres in Afghanistan, the largest illegal narcotics crop ever produced by a modern nation.  A government crackdown on poppy cultivation has spelled economic disaster for many communities throughout the country.  (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

Bild: AP

16. Kundgebung

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

Afghan members of civil society organizations chant slogans as they march in a street, during an anti terrorism demonstration in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014. Hundreds of Afghans gathered outside a Lebanese restaurant in Kabul on Sunday to protest against Taliban attack that killed 21 people. The assault Friday by a Taliban bomber and two gunmen against the La Taverna du Liban restaurant was deadliest single attack against foreign civilians in the course of a nearly 13-year U.S.-led war there now approaching its end.   They chanted slogans against terrorism as they laid flowers at the site of the attack. The dead included 13 foreigners and eight Afghans, all civilians. The attack came as security has been deteriorating and apprehension has been growing among Afghans over their country's future as U.S.-led foreign forces prepare for a final withdrawal at the end of the year. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)

Bild: AP

17. Patrouille

Bild: Esterson/Podlich

A child swing on a rope as a police armored vehicle patrols out side of  Sakhi Shrine on occasion of Nawroz, a new year ceremony, in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, March 21, 2011. In a speech marking the Afghan new year, Vice President Abdul Karim Khalili on Monday called on militants to lay down their weapons because the nation would never going to return to the days of hardline Taliban rule. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)

Bild: AP

18. Am Weg

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

An Afghan municipal worker stands on trash at a garbage site in Kabul, Afghanistan on Wednesday, March 24, 2010. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)

Bild: AP

19. Ballonverkäufer

Bild: Esterson/Podlich 

Afghan balloon seller, Muhammed Wahidullah, 20, picks a balloon for boy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, Nov. 14, 2011. (AP Photo/Ahmad Jamshid)

Bild: AP

Thomas Brunner hat auf Twitter dieses Bild geteilt

Vielen Dank für den Input

Abonniere unseren Newsletter

3
Bubble Weil wir die Kommentar-Debatten weiterhin persönlich moderieren möchten, sehen wir uns gezwungen, die Kommentarfunktion 48 Stunden nach Publikation einer Story zu schliessen. Vielen Dank für dein Verständnis!
3Alle Kommentare anzeigen
    Alle Leser-Kommentare
  • Znuk 03.03.2014 11:49
    Highlight Highlight Kite Runner.

    Das Buch von Khaled Hosseini aus dem Jahr 2003 beschreibt den Wandel von Kabul sehr gut.

    Und es war nicht der Westen, der diese Veränderungen hervorgerufen hat. Die Truppen auf den Fotos kamen erst viel später.
  • Adonis 03.03.2014 11:15
    Highlight Highlight ...ist so Squalli! Frage mich, wie lange sich der Westen in all die Dinge der andern Welt einmischen solltte und muss. Vermutlich ist es zu spät. Ganz raus können die westlichen Truppen wohl nicht. Ich frage mich, wie lange es geht, bis das Ganze Paket der Wut aus diesen Ländern auf uns zurückschlägt. Ich denke es ist nur eine Frage der Zeit, bis die erste schmutzige A-Bombe, Chemiezeugs oder was auch immer, irgendwo im Westen eine furchtbare Katastrophe auslöst. Ich bin kein praktizierender Christ, fürchte aber, dass das jüngste Gericht die Meschen sprich: Muslime Christen und umgekehrt, auslösen werden. Immerhin hat Pakistan die A-Bombe! Was passiert, wenn die in die falschen Hände gerät? Regt auch zum Nachdenken an.
  • Squalli 03.03.2014 08:10
    Highlight Highlight Was für ein schöner, eindrücklicher, beängstigender und herzzerreisender Bericht!
    Die Bilder sprechen mehr als 1000 Worte.
    Danke für den Einblick - regt zum Nachdenken an.. :(

Linksautonome Schweizer marschierten an «Gilets-jaunes»-Protesten mit

Unter die «gilets jaunes» in Paris mischten sich am Samstag auch Mitglieder der linksradikalen «Revolutionären Jugend». Sie wollten Solidarität bekunden, «Erfahrungen in Strassenkämpfen» sammeln und «untersuchen, inwiefern sich Rechtsextreme an den Protesten beteiligen.»

Proteste der «Gelbwesten» mit Krawallen und Ausschreitungen haben Frankreich an diesem Wochenende erneut in Atem gehalten. Unter die Demonstranten mischten sich anscheinend auch Schweizer Linksautonome.

Mitglieder der Revolutionären Jugend Bern schreiben auf Facebook, sie hätten sich in Paris ein Bild der Bewegung machen können, das «sehr positiv und motivierend» ausfalle. Darunter publizieren sie ein Foto eines brennenden Autos. 

Auch die Zürcher Sektion der Bewegung berichtet von …

Artikel lesen
Link to Article